Teaching about Wildlife Migration
Dec. 4, Hyde Park

Critical habitat…contain[s] the physical or biological features…essential to the conservation of endangered and threatened species….  US Fish & Wildlife Service (more)

A number of migratory species use the Hudson Valley’s critical habitat as breeding and spawning grounds. During this CTLE-approved professional development day, schoolteachers and non-formal educators will  learn more about eels, bald eagles, striped bass, and sturgeon — their habits and how to teach about them in active ways.

Participation — 8:45 to 4, Monday, Dec. 4 — is free and includes lunch, but advance registration is required. Register here by November 28.

We will meet at the Henry A. Wallace Visitor and Education Center on the grounds of the Home of FDR National Historic Site and the Presidential Library and Museum. The program is sponsored by the Hudson River Estuary Program, New York State Dept. of Environmental Conservation and Teaching the Hudson Valley.

Program

Featured morning presentations for all are:

  • Forest Amphibians and their Annual Migration, Laura Heady, conservation and land use coordinator, NYS DEC’s Hudson River Estuary Program and Cornell University
  • Migrating Locally and Globally with Birds,  Lindsay Glasner, Birdsleuth K-12 outreach coordinator, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
  • Migratory Fish of the Hudson River, Amanda Higgs, fisheries biologist, NYS DEC’s Hudson River Estuary Program and Cornell University Dept. of Natural Resources
  • The Eel’s Amazing Migration: A Focus on the Adult Spawning Run, Sarah Mount, science educator, Hudson River National Estuarine Research Reserve

    Glass eels by Leon Liao submitted to Nat’l Geographic’s “Your Shot,” 2012.

In the afternoon experienced educators from classrooms and non-formal settings will present hands-on activities. Choose from these:

  • Beginning and Keeping Natural History Journals, Tom Lake, naturalist
  • Bird Migration: Interactive Games and Activities to Make Learning Fun, Laura Conner and Nick Martin, NYS Office of Parks, Recreation, and Historic Preservation
  • Birds, Migration, and Flying WILD, Brittany DiLeo, NYS Dept. of Environmental Conservation
  • DATA JAM, Michelle Forster, Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies
  • Free the Tribs: Improving Passage for Fish and Floods in Your Community’s Streams, Megan Lung and Andrew Meyer, NYS DEC’s Hudson River Estuary Program
  • Keepin’ it Eel: Community, Science, and the American Glass Eel, Grace Ballou,  Hudson River Estuary Program, NYS DEC
  • Migrating Miracles, Betty Boomer, environmental educator
  • Migration – Keeping Stock, Margie Turrin, Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory
  • Migration Obstacle Course,  Lindsay Glasner, Birdsleuth K-12 outreach coordinator, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
  • Musical Migrations, Chris Bowser, NYS DEC’s Hudson River Estuary Program and NYS Water Resources Institute, Cornell University
  • Teaching About Native Pollen Bees, Timothy Stanley, Fresh Air Fund’s Sharpe Reservation
  • These Maps are for the Birds…and Reptiles…and Fish, Steve Stanne, NYS DEC’s Hudson River Estuary Program and NYS Water Resources Institute, Cornell University

Click for report: Citizen Science Programs Advance the Public Understanding of Science  — Center for Advancement of Informal Science Education

Download the one-page program. For more information, please email or phone (845-256-3115) Rebecca Houser at the Estuary Program.