Posts by: THV

Second grade poets

Meet the top scoring elementary students in this year’s Writing about Place. They attend Riccardi Elementary, Saugerties Central School District, and are students of Frances Murphy.

Student writers express love for our Valley

Students who entered THV’s writing contest delighted us with descriptions of – and feelings about – significant places in our area. In the coming months we’ll be sharing their poems and essays. For now, we’re pleased to introduce the winners.

Welcome 2017!

Happy new year to you and yours from THV! We’re welcoming 2017 with inspiration from Eleanor Roosevelt’s My Day columns and some delightful new year’s eve menu illustrations from the The Culinary Institute of America’s Archives and Special Collections.

Happy Holidays from THV!

Happy holidays and best wishes for a peaceful new year from THV. We hope you enjoy these winter scenes by Woodstock artist Harry Gottlieb (1895-1992). Keep teaching the Hudson Valley!

December is Human Rights Month

Activities and lessons commemorating adoption of the UDHR can be especially meaningful in the Hudson Valley because of Eleanor Roosevelt’s lead role in drafting and securing its passage.

Back to school
Place-based learning resource round up

Tips (including funding sources) for building place into your school year. Plus, Hudson Valley sources for low cost materials. Plus, faces from this year’s summer institute.

NPS Centennial: Find YOUR Park

In honor of the National Park Service Centennial THV’s summer book group tackled “The National Parks: America’s Best Idea” by Dayton Duncan and Ken Burns (Knopf Doubleday, 2009, 403 pp). Participants reflected on their favorite parks, and we’ll be sharing their observations. Here are two.

Thanks & good luck!

We LOVED having Alex with us for the summer and wish her all the best.

Scenes from #THV2016

Coming soon: handouts, Power Points, and other goodies from this year’s institute, Find Your Park, Historic Site, Museum: Gain a Classroom. In the meantime, enjoy these photos.

Water Celery: The Hudson River’s Biggest Secret

Jennifer Reid wants her elementary-age students to understand that each organism contributes to the creation of a viable ecosystem. To simplify a complex process, she focuses on a single plant. The lesson features a poetic story that helps students visualize what happens to plants and animals as the tide rolls in and out.